Resignation Letter of Intent

Every interaction you have with your colleagues, supervisors, and company managers contributes to your reputation as a respected employee with the companies and the team’s best interests in mind. Although you are leaving the company, a resignation letter of intent can make a positive contribution to your reputation as a responsible manager or employee.

People communicate within industries and companies. They also transfer and move from company to company. In your career, you may cross paths with many of your colleagues several times at different companies. The old saying applies, “Never burn any bridges”. A colleague today could be your supervisor or hiring manager in the future at another firm.

A well-written, positive, and helpful resignation letter can add to your reputation as a responsible employee who can be counted on, even though you are leaving the company.

What is a Resignation Letter of Intent?

A resignation letter of intent is a formal official document indicating your intent to resign, creating a record for human resources. Many companies require a formal letter or an email indicating your resignation. It is customary to provide sufficient notice to provide time for your manager to find a replacement and maintain the operation without impact. Although he or she will be disappointed that you are leaving, they will appreciate the advance notice allowing them to prepare for your departure.

Delivering a resignation letter in advance of your last day also provides company managers time to consider options to sweeten your contract with the hopes of retaining you on contract. The letter should be professional and brief, no more than one page in length.

There are of course, situations due to perceived security risks, where the employees are allowed to clean out their desks and are shown the door. Although this leaves a negative feeling for the employee, it should not be taken personally if this is a standard security policy at your company.

What to Include

One of the most important points is to keep your letter positive. Avoid negative comments about your company and colleagues. You never know when you may need a reference, or you will be working with some of your colleagues in future companies and careers.

Always include the last day of work in your letter. This data helps your employer plan around your resignation to redistribute your work, find a replacement, and so on.

Although it is not necessary, you may also explain your reason for leaving, e.g. family reasons, moving, career opportunities. Avoid comparing your new position with your current position.

Your reputation and relationship with your current employer can be enhanced by offering to help with the transition before your departure. Every job is unique; however, among the steps you can take include:

  • Update all of your client files, project files, and status reports
  • Advise team members of your planned departure
  • Provide an update on your projects, including items not completed and next steps
  • Offer to meet with colleagues and your replacement to transition the job to your replacement
  • Include your contact information in the letter for the company to reach out to you if needed.

How to Write

Although this comment may seem obvious, employees planning to leave a position for a new job may want to wait until they have accepted the new position. Resigning and then finding out that the offer you were promised verbally does not materialize could place you in a difficult position financially if you are out of work.

The letter should be professional, formal, and no longer than one page. Collect your information and use the following format:

(Your Name)

(Title, Company or Institution)

(Full address and)

(Email)

(Phone number)

(Date)

(Your Supervisor and/or Human Resources)

(Title)

(Full address, and)

(Email)

(Phone number)

Dear (Name)

Body – Paragraph 1 – Introduction – State intent to resign and provide date

Body – Paragraph 2 – Include a thank you for working in their organization

Body – Paragraph 3 – Include transition steps and offer to help, address important issues

Closing – Sincerely, regards,

Signature

Printed Name

Sample Resignation Letter of Intent

(Your Name)

(Title, Company or Institution)

(Full address and)

(Email)

(Phone number)

(Date)

(Your Supervisor and/or Human Resources)

(Title)

(Full address, and)

(Email)

(Phone number)

Dear (Name)

I am writing to advise of my resignation and departure from my position at (company name), (position), effective (Date).

This was a difficult decision for me. I have enjoyed working for the company and with my colleagues over the past (X) years. Our team has been very successful in achieving many milestones and improving customer service. (include job-specific successes). Thank you for the opportunities and experience I have gained at (Name of Company).

During my remaining time with the company, I plan to update all of my project files, provide status reports, and brief my team members. I can also brief my replacement to facilitate the transition of the job. Please advise if there are other steps I can assist with to help with the transition. I wish the company and your team great success and hope we can stay in touch in the future.

Sincerely

(Signature)

(Printed Name)

Resignation Letter of Intent (Word Template)

Resignation Letter of Intent

Do’s and Don’ts

There are some critical do’s and don’ts for preparing and sending a resignation letter. Consider your actions carefully before going public with your resignation and advising your supervisor.

Some of the things you should do are:

DO keep your resignation letter positive. Not only is it the last impression you make with your former colleagues and supervisors, a negative one could surpass all of the good work you did at the company.

DO deliver your resignation using a formal letter or email to close your human resources file and it assures that all of the concerned management and supervisors are made aware. Always be humble and courteous regardless of why you are leaving.

Do offer to assist in transitioning your responsibilities and deliverables to whoever is selected by your management team. This step is good etiquette and can be a learning experience as well. The types of things you could be asked to help out with during transition include:

  • Help interview your replacement
  • Train your replacement
  • Documenting processes used in your job
  • Documenting the status of all of your projects
  • Preparing a hit list for the new incumbent

Some of the things you should not do are:

Don’t brag about the new job. People don’t like to hear about these sorts of things, plus if it does not work out, you may wish you could come back to the old job or join a firm some of your colleagues have moved to. Stay on good terms as much as possible. You might want to use them for a reference in the future.

Don’t always tell the truth in your final exit interview. While you might not like the company or your boss, there is no need to alienate folks who might in the future be called upon to be a reference for you or someone you work with in the future. It is surprising how many times people will interact with each other on multiple jobs with multiple companies.

Don’t quit your job without giving sufficient notice. Again it is amazing how often people work with each other over the years in multiple careers, jobs and companies. Avoid creating unnecessary bad relations.

Key-points, Conclusion, or Final Thoughts

Employees who are resigning should always endeavor to provide adequate notice of their plans to resign. It maintains your reputation as a reasonable and responsible person that can be counted on. No one faults an employee for trying to better themselves.

There may be times when a reasonable notice cannot be provided. There may be family situations or other personal situations triggering the resignation. Always apologize for the short notice and offer to help with the transition if you are able. The offer will be appreciated.

Keep your letter of resignation professional and positive. Provide the final date when you will leave and offer to help with the transition. You can even mention those items that you are planning to complete before leaving i.e. project status and documentation.

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